LABOR, LITERATURE AND LANDMARK LECTURE SERIES  Landmark Lectures 2017 The General Society Landmarks Lectures are presented in partnership with the New York Landmarks Conservancy. The Landmarks lectures focus on the origin, development, and restoration of New York City’s built environment, and celebrate the art and architecture of the City. Lisa Easton, a partner in the New York City based architecture and historic preservation firm, Easton Architects, curates the series. The 2017 Landmarks lectures are: Tuesday, February 21st at 6:30 p.m. – Julie L. Sloan, Consultants in Stained Glass, New York: Birth Place of American Stained Glass

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Stained glass expert, Julie Sloan, will describe the history and development of stained glass in New York City. Until the turn of the 19th century, New York was the center of production and innovation for this medieval craft. Here, both a traditional, and a secular demand, expanded the market and enticed the participation of artists. Examples of stained glass from every era still survive in New York, telling this exciting story, with work by the Dutch glazier Evert Duykinck and the Gothic Revival designs of Richard Upjohn and William Jay Bolton, to the iridescent glories of Louis Comfort Tiffany and John La Farge. Although the center of the business left the city in the 20th century, superb examples of modern stained glass are also found here, such as the ethereal azures of Marc Chagall’s windows for the United Nations. Tuesday, March 28th at 6:30 p.m. – Robert C. Bates, Principal 
Walter B. Melvin Architects, Tuesday, April 18th at 6:30 p.m – Mary Kay Judy, Architectural and Cultural Heritage Conservation Tuesday, May 16th at 6:30 p.m. – Derek Trelstad, Associate, Silman Structural Engineers The Lectures start at 6:30 pm in The General Society Library, 20 West 44th Street, New York City. Reception to follow. Advance registration is suggested. $15 General admission; $10 General Society members, NY Landmarks Conservancy Members & Senior Citizens; $5 Students. To register please click here. This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. We would also like to acknowledge the support of New York Landmarks Conservancy .  Please scroll down to see our Landmark Lectures from the winter/spring of 2016 - many of these lectures can be viewed on our YouTube Channel) The Landmark lectures focus on the origins, development, and restoration of New York City’s built environment, and celebrate the art and architecture of the City. Lisa Easton, a partner in the New York City based architecture and historic preservation firm, Easton Architects curates the series.  The following Landmark lectures took place in the Winter/Spring of 2016: Tuesday, February 16 - Film Screening of Modern Ruin with film-maker Matthew Silva  The New York State Pavilion, once the shining symbol of the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, now sits as a haunting reminder of what became of the age of optimism that was the 1960's. This fascinating and warmly-received film tells the story of Philip Johnson's New York State Pavilion during the glory days of the fair, and chronicles its demise over the past 50 years. The film details its post-fair use as a 60's concert venue and 70's roller rink, including the years of neglect and the recent growing advocacy efforts to save and re-purpose the structure. Matthew Silva is a teacher, filmmaker, and co-founder of People For the Pavilion, an organization dedicated to preserving the New York State Pavilion. Since 2012, Matthew has worked by way of art and social media to raise interest and change public perception for what is possible for the Pavilion. With support from a strong social media community and a coalition of various New York based civic, advocacy, and cultural institutions, he produced the 2015 documentary film Modern Ruin: A World’s Fair Pavilion which chronicles the history of Philip Johnson's Pavilion from the fair, through ruin, to present day advocacy.   After the film's screening, there will be a short Q&A with Mr. Silva. Tuesday, March 15th at 6:30 p.m. – Nancy R. Hudson, Robert Silman Associates, Renovations at the Guggenheim Museum Nancy Hudson, Structural Engineer with Robert Silman Associates, will discuss the intricate and delicate renovations at the Guggenheim that extended over three years. To remain faithful to Frank Lloyd Wright’s original intent, many compromises needed to be made with materials used in the reconstruction. Tuesday, April 19 at 6:30 p.m Glenn Boornazian, Integrated Conservation Resources, The Development of Architectural Conservation Programs for Mid-Century Modern Structures Glenn Boornazian, President and Principal Architectural Conservator for Integrated Conservation Resources will discuss the role that architectural conservation plays in the development of conservation programs for mid-century modern structures. Mr. Boornazian will cite a number of recent ICR projects including the Saarinen TWA building, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum, and Wright’s Florida Southern College.  Tuesday, May 24th at 6:30 p.m.  Richard W. Southwick, Partner, Director of Historic Preservation, Beyer Blinder Belle, Life, Death and Rebirth of the TWA Flight Center Vacant for nearly 15 years, the Eero Saarinen-designed TWA Flight Center is proposed to be adapted to a new hotel, restaurant and conference center facility. In his lecture Richard Southwick will explore the historic context in which the TWA Terminal was designed as a centerpiece of JFK International Airport and the design process Saarinen undertook for the building and its critical acclaim signifying it as a Modern Icon. Opened in 1962 at the advent of the jet age, the building was effectively obsolete within a decade due to the rapid advances within the aviation industry. The talk will examine the storied and troubled history of TWA which led to the preservation efforts to save the building, the recent restoration of the Flight Center and the development process resulting in the current design proposal. Advance registration is suggested. The Lectures start at 6:30 pm in The General Society Library, 20 West 44th Street, New York City.  Reception to follow.  $15 General Admission $10 General Society & NY Landmarks Conservancy Members & Senior Citizens $5 Students. To register please contact the General Society at: 212.840.1840  ext. 2 or email: meg.stanton@generalsociety.org   This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

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We would also like to acknowledge the support of  New York Landmarks Conservancy.

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