Landmark Lectures Summer 2021

Hidden in Plain Sight – The Cast Stone of  The Coignet Building

Mary Jablonski, President and Founder of Jablonski Building Conservation.

This will be an Online Lecture on Tuesday, July 27th at 6 p.m.

Presented in Partnership with The New York Landmarks Conservancy

To register please click here

Buildings can have stories hidden within the products used to construct them. When research is carefully undertaken, interesting stories unfold. One of the most intriguing examples of this is the Coignet Building in Brooklyn. In her talk, Mary Jablonski, President of Jablonski Building Conservation will discuss this unique building and the role her firm played in its conservation.

In 1873, the New York and Long Island Coignet Stone Company built offices along the Gowanus Canal to serve as an advertisement for the company’s cast stone products. It is believed to be the earliest cast stone building in the country. The building was a showcase for the firm with its veneer cast stone block surfaces having a variety of finishes; rusticated, smooth, beveled, and ornamented surfaces displaying the possibilities of the new cast stone material. The building miraculously survived and has become a significant element in the story of industrialization of building products and the growing importance of concrete. One hundred and forty years after it was built, the Coignet Building remained standing, barely.

When work began on the restoration of the Coignet Building in 2014, little was known about the cast stone. The first step was to gain a firm understanding of the materials and how they were deteriorating in order to know how to best repair the cast stone. As part of the materials study, petrographic and chemical examinations were performed on cast stone samples. The findings were illuminating. In her talk, Ms. Jablonski will describe what Jablonski Building Conservation discovered and how the building was conserved and restored.

Mary Jablonski is the President and Founder of Jablonski Building Conservation, Inc. and has over 26 years’ experience in historic conservation. She oversees the firm’s projects to ensure a consistent methodology is applied across projects and to maintain quality control. She has special interests in decorative finishes, early 1800s frame buildings, and modern materials including plastics. She is a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation and the Association for Preservation Technology and an adjunct associate professor in the Historic Preservation Program at Columbia University.

For information on Jablonski Building Conservation, please click here.

Suggested donation:

$15 General Admission; $10 General Society Members, New York Landmarks Conservancy Members and Senior Citizens; $5 Students.

Advance registration is required to receive the link to the Zoom Webinar Platform.

Photo credit: Trix Rosen

Suggested donation: $15 General Admission; $10 General Society Members and Senior Citizens; $5 Students. Advance registration is required to receive the link to the Zoom Webinar Platform.

Landmark Lectures Spring 2021

The Landmark Lectures focus on the origin, development, and restoration of New York City’s built environment, and celebrate the art and architecture of the City. Lisa Easton, a partner in the New York City based architecture and historic preservation firm, Easton Architects, curates the series.  They are presented in partnership with the New York Landmarks Conservancy.  The remaining lectures for this Spring season are:

Tuesday, June 22ndat 6pm – Landmark LectureThe Impact & Possibilities of Preservation: Lessons from the Neighborhood Preservation Center with Felicia Mayro

Through the lens of her experience at the Neighborhood Preservation Center, Felicia Mayro will talk about some of the projects and people moving preservation forward today and share the goals of the new Neighborhood Preservation Center. To register, please click here.

Tuesday, June 29th at 6pm –Forensic Architecture: The Making of the Tenement Museum

with Nick Leahy, Co-CEO and Executive Director, Perkins Eastman and special guest, Dave Favaloro, Senior Director of Curatorial Affairs and Hebrew Technical Institute Research Fellow, Tenement Museum.

To register. please click here.

Presented in Partnership with The New York Landmarks Conservancy

This will be an Online Lecture

The tenement holds a special place in the urban and social history of New York City and, indeed, the story of immigration to America. New York’s City’s Tenement Museum, founded in 1988 as a fledgling museum, has evolved over the years into one of the most popular cultural destinations in the city.

Its survival through the devastating impact of COVID-19 and its recent re-opening are testaments to not only the museum’s staff and the grit and the tenacity of its supporters, but also to the importance of this institution, the stories it tells, and the significance of its work for people across America and the globe. This very human story is captured in the buildings, spaces, and artifacts that have been left behind—evidence to the extraordinary lives of the ordinary people who came to the city to start a new life.

In this talk, Nick Leahy of Perkins Eastman will look at the development of the museum into a unique civic resource that preserves the buildings and stories of the historic Lower East Side neighborhood. Focusing on its expansion from 2006 until 2019, the build-out of 97 Orchard Street, as well as its expansion into 103 Orchard Street, it is an intimate window into the neighborhood that was once the nation’s most active immigrant portal.

This lecture will peel back the literal layers of history that comprise the urban campus of the Tenement Museum. Mr. Leahy, describes the approach to the work at the museum as “forensic architecture,” preserving century-old tenements and revealing the stories of nearly 20,000 residents who lived there from the late 1800s through the 1970s.

Through the lens of his experience working alongside the museum as Principal-in-Charge of the project over the course of more than 14 years, Mr. Leahy will explain the techniques and materials used to construct the buildings and neighborhoods of late 19th-century New York City—and how sensitive, modern interventions can help showcase their lessons. He will tour participants through the history of the Museum’s urban campus─from dilapidated, structurally compromised tenement buildings built in the 1860s into the civic resource it is today.

Along the way, Mr. Leahy will explain the process of creating a museum and how evolving building practices and codes impacted inhabitant health and welfare. He also will reveal the significant challenges of safely reproducing the conditions that retain these buildings’ historic significance, responsive to the Museum’s vision and educational goals.

For more information on Perkins Eastman, please click here. For more information on the Tenement Museum, please click here.

Nick Leahy is Co-CEO and Executive Director at Perkins Eastman, His projects are distinguished by their critical balance of place, program, and craft. Key to his design methodology is to investigate each site’s relationship to its environment, history, and its intended use. His designs for civic buildings, performing arts centers, museums, and institutional facilities can be found across the United States, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. In addition to his work on the Tenement Museum, these projects include the internationally renowned TKTS Booth in the heart of Times Square; the winning international design competition entry for the Shanghai World Expo Public Events Center; the Museum of Natural History Spitzer Hall of Human Origins and Butterfly Conservatory; the Container Globe, a modern interpretation of the famous Globe Theater designed and constructed entirely from shipping containers; and numerous others.

Dave Favaloro is Senior Director of Curatorial Affairs and Hebrew Technical Institute Research Fellow at the Tenement Museum. He is responsible for interpreting the history of the tenements at 97 and 103 Orchard Street, with an emphasis on research and exhibit development. He also oversees the museum’s preservation, conservation, and collections management programs. He holds a Master of Arts in American History and an Advanced Certificate in Public History from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Suggested donation: $15 General Admission; $10 General Society Members and Senior Citizens; $5 Students. Advance registration is required to receive the link to the Zoom Webinar Platform.

 

Spring and Winter Lectures 2021

·   Tuesday, May 25th at 6pm – Landmark Lecture – “It All Began with a Portal: Thoughts on the Preservation of Cultural Heritage” with Norma Barbacci, Principal, Norma Barbacci Preservation Consultants LLC

Norma Barbacci will discuss in broad strokes, the evolution of cultural heritage preservation from a narrow focus on tangible properties to a broader, more complex and more inclusive vision. It will draw parallels from the history and projects of the World Monuments Fund, a private preservation organization, where Ms. Barbacci was Director of Programs for Latin America, Spain and Portugal between 2001 and 2017, as well as recent projects of Norma Barbacci Preservation Consultants. To Register, please click here

 

Down the Bridle Path: Exploring the Vestiges of Greenwich Village’s Equine Past

With Gregory Dietrich of Gregory Dietrich Preservation Consulting

For centuries New Yorkers relied on horses to transport them uptown, downtown, crosstown, and beyond, often retracing the paths created by the Native Americans on horseback who came before them. However, nearly all of the city’s equine culture has been forgotten, supplanted by a cacophony of cars, trucks, motorcycles, and bicycles. And yet this history is not only present, but especially palpable in Greenwich Village, which still offers vestiges of the City’s equine past through its former horsewalks, stables, and mews. Join architectural historian, Gregory Dietrich, as he takes you down the bridle path of this all but forgotten, yet tangible, legacy of Village horse culture.

$15 General Admission; $10 General Society Members,  and Senior Citizens; $5 Students.

Advance registration is required to receive the link to the zoom webinar platform.

Fall Landmark Lecture 2020

Saving the Battery Maritime Building

Tim Fryatt, Director, Marvel Architects

In partnership with The New York Landmarks Conservancy

This will be an Online Lecture on Tuesday, November 24th 2021 at 6pm

Please click here to register

The 1909 Battery Maritime Building (“BMB”) was once the crown jewel of the New York City Waterfront, but over time became vacant, neglected, and was crumbling into the East River. The effort to save the BMB is 18 years in the making, and nearing completion.

In this lecture, Tim Fryatt, Director of Marvel Architects will discuss the project and during his presentation will offer a visual tour of the building through time, highlighting challenges in adaptive reuse along the way. Working with NYC Economic Development Corporation and the developer Midtown Equities, Marvel Architects identified unique needs to satisfy modern safety standards and new building uses, to ensure the buildings historic legacy is preserved. Strategies included techniques in preservation, restoration, and reconstruction, which varied in scale from holistic design approaches to creative technical detailing.

Through a careful process the team has crafted an elegantly modern and historically sensitive redevelopment, a cornerstone to the city’s broad-based goals of transforming Lower Manhattan into a vibrant mixed-use community and revitalizing the waterfront for the 21st century.

Tim Fryatt, AIA is Director at Marvel Architects with 22 years of experience leading complex projects in across a wide range of scales and sectors. Known as a prolific designer and a creative catalyst, he is dedicated to developing meaningful places that leverage latent value, behave naturally, and inspire delight. Presently Mr. Fryatt is lead Architect overseeing over 1 million square feet of development across 3 boroughs of New York City. A registered architect, and a member of the Maplewood NJ Township Planning Board, Tim Fryatt’s work has been widely awarded, published, and exhibited, including in the New York Times and Museum Of Modern Art.

Suggested donation:

$15 General Admission; $10 General Society Members, New York Landmark Conservancy Members and Senior Citizens; $5 Students.

Advance registration is required to receive the link to the zoom webinar platform.  Please click here to register

 

2020 FALL LANDMARK ONLINE LECTURE SERIES

The Landmark Lectures focus on the origin, development, and restoration of New York City’s built environment, and celebrate the art and architecture of the City. Lisa Easton, a partner in the New York City based architecture and historic preservation firm, Easton Architects, curates the series.  They are presented in partnership with the New York Landmarks Conservancy.

The 2020 Landmark Lectures (which have been rescheduled from the Spring) are:

  • Tuesday, September 29th at 6:00 p.m. Gregory Dietrich, Gregory Dietrich Preservation Consulting, Finding Their Architectural Roots: Cracking the Mystery of One of Brooklyn’s Most Prolific and Distinguished Architectural Firms

 Gregory Dietrich, architectural historian,  will describe the work of the Parfitt Brothers, three English brothers who designed some of Brooklyn’s most distinctive buildings from Bensonhurst to Brooklyn Heights.   Seeking to unlock the mystery of their past, Mr. Dietrich will talk about his quest to uncover the brothers’ origins, from their humble beginnings in England, to their early years in Brooklyn and the subsequent opening of the practice that led to their renown. The company evolved into one of the borough’s leading architecture firms of its day during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, designing a range of buildings in a wide variety of styles. Advance registration is required to receive the link to the webinar platform. Please click here to register.

  • Tuesday, October 13th at 6:00 p.m. – Rachel Miller and Timothy Miller, Co-Owners of Spirit Ironworks, Henry St Settlement – Story of a Loving Restoration

 Rachel Miller and Timothy Miller will discuss the ironwork restoration of one of New York City’s most beloved, and historically significant social services agencies, Henry Street Settlement. This talk will explore the processes involved in restoring historic ironwork on three Federal style buildings. The project was a rare opportunity to explore how pre-Civil War ironwork was constructed. They will also describe how the restoration process incorporated many traditional metalworking techniques such as; forging genuine wrought iron, tool and die making and replicating cast iron elements. They will also touch upon some of the partners that made the project possible including: Li/Saltzman Architects, Henry St. Settlement, The New York Landmarks Conservancy, and NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission.   (Please note this lecture has been rescheduled from Thursday September 17th to Tuesday, October 13th.) Advance registration is required to receive the link to the webinar platform. Please click here to register.

  • Tuesday, October 20th at 6:00 p.m.  Patrick W. Ciccone, Preservationist & Co-Author of Bricks & Brownstone: The New York Row House 

Patrick W. Ciccone, a New York City-based preservationist who has led major historic rehabilitation projects in Manhattan, Brooklyn, upstate New York, and Pennsylvania will discuss the book he co-authored, Bricks & Brownstone: The New York Row House. This newly revised edition is considered to be the gold standard reference on brownstone architecture and interiors, and one of the few truly classic histories of New York’s urbanism.  Advance registration is required to receive the link to the webinar platform. Please click here to register.

1.0 AIA LU credit is available for qualifying participants

Suggested donation: $15 General Admission; $10 General Society Members and New York Landmarks Conservancy Members and Senior Citizens; $5 Students.

Advance registration is required to receive the link to the zoom webinar platform.

 

 

Landmark Lectures Winter/Spring 2020

The only Landmark Lecture of  Winter/Spring 2020 was held on February 18th, and featured Anthony W. Robins, an acclaimed historian and writer who discussed, Grand Central Terminal: 100 Years of a New York Landmark where he outlined the history of Grand Central and its central role in the formation of midtown Manhattan. His engaging and informative lecture was enthusiastically received.

LANDMARK LECTURES 2019

The Landmarks lectures focus on the origin, development, and restoration of New York City’s built environment, and celebrate the art and architecture of the City. Lisa Easton, a partner in the New York City based architecture and historic preservation firm, Easton Architects, curates the series. The Landmark lectures are presented in partnership with The New York Landmarks Conservancy.

  • Tuesday, March 19th at 6.30 p.m. –  Janet W. Foster, Architectural Historian and Historic Preservation Consultant,Pattern Books and 19thCentury American Building

During her lecture,  Architectural Historian & Preservation Consultant, Janet W. Fosterwill discuss how published books of designs, or pattern books, had a significant role in changing the appearance of buildings, and the techniques of their construction, in 19thcentury America.  The role of pattern books in shaping the developing suburban landscape, their impact on a changing construction labor market, and the rise of several New York City publishing houses that promoted these books of architectural design all combine to tell both a very New York story and a broader look at national trends in building. Advance Registration is required, to reserve your place, please click here.

  •  Tuesday April 16th at 6:30 p.m.– Michael Devonshire, Director of Conservation, Jan Hird Pokorny Associates, Through the Glass: The Evolution of the Window in Historic Buildings

 Michael Devonshire, Principal and Director of Conservation, JHPA, Inc. at  is an architectural conservator with forty year’s experience in the field of historic preservation. For his presentation he will describe a history of windows, the perception of windows in art, and examine how windows have functioned in history.  Mr. Devonshire will review the stylistic and technological changes to the window as an architectural element, as it evolved from hand-made components to machine-made. He will detail how windows are essential and character-defining components of historic buildings.  Advance Registration is required, please click here to reserve your place.

  • Tuesday, May 21stat 6:30 p.m. Jean-Francois D. Furieri, Founder of Iconoplast,The Restoration, Preservation, and Conservation of Architectural Ornamental Plaster

 Jean-Francois D. Furieri, a third generation master plasterer, founded Iconoplast  one of the few companies still specializing in restoration, preservation and conservation of  architectural ornamental plaster. The company’s studious techniques and generations-old skills are integrated with modern technologies to create a hands-on approach to this traditional craft. During his talk, Mr. Furieri will outline the history of plaster, new technologies in plaster, and describe a theatre restoration on 42nd street, recently completed by Iconoplast. Advance Registration is required, please click here to reserve your place.

  • Tuesday, June 18th at 6:30 p.m.  – Christopher P. Pinto, Associate Principal,  Thornton Tomasetti, The Preservation of Cast Iron Construction

Christopher Pinto, Associate Principal, Thornton Tomasetti, has considerable experience in structural analysis and design with a specialization in investigative projects and the restoration of historic structures. His notable projects include the recently completed rehabilitation of the cast iron dome of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. At his lecture, he will discuss cast iron detailing and construction with an emphasis on methods of repair, including a discussion of repair detailing at the Capitol Dome and at the Harlem Fire Watchtower.   Advance Registration is required, please click here to reserve your place.

The Lectures start at 6:30 pm in The General Society Library, 20 West 44th Street, New York City.  Reception to follow.  Advance registration is required. $15 General admission; $10 General Society members, NY Landmarks Conservancy Members & Senior Citizens; $5 Students. To register please email: karin.taylor@generalsociety.org.

1.0 AIA LU credit is available for qualifying participants.